INSCOM: Continuity and Change:

      In the aftermath of the Vietnam War, the U.S. Army reorganized almost all of its institutional and training headquarters to streamline important administrative functions while improving operational effectiveness. In late 1974, the Army cast its eyes on Army Intelligence to see if it was effectively organized and efficiently managed. The instrument of this scrutiny was the Intelligence Organization and Stationing Study (IOSS), a panel of senior officers headed by Maj. Gen. James J. Ursano. Released in mid-1975, the IOSS report recommended that the Army break up existing intelligence organizations and reassemble them into a new configuration. These recommendations led to the most sweeping reorganization of Army intelligence in a generation. At the center of this transformation, the Army established a single intelligence command to control an integrated, worldwide structure that provided multi-discipline intelligence support to the Army. The Army Security Agency (ASA), the Army’s Signals Intelligence (SIGINT) organization, was the cornerstone of this new command. To align itself to the new Army structure, ASA transferred its training, combat development resources, and logistics organization to other Army commands. In addition, ASA’s tactical SIGINT units were reassigned to the divisions or corps that they supported. On 1 January 1977, ASA was redesignated as U.S. Army Intelligence and Security Command (INSCOM). The new command merged ASA’s remaining SIGINT assets with the Counterintelligence (CI) and Human Intelligence (HUMINT) assets of the U.S. Army Intelligence Agency (USAINTA). Now a multi-discipline intelligence organization, INSCOM was formally established on 1 October 1977.

      In the aftermath of the Vietnam War, the U.S. Army reorganized almost all of its institutional and training headquarters to streamline important administrative functions while improving operational effectiveness. In late 1974, the Army cast its eyes on Army Intelligence to see if it was effectively organized and efficiently managed. The instrument of this scrutiny was the Intelligence Organization and Stationing Study (IOSS), a panel of senior officers headed by Maj. Gen. James J. Ursano. Released in mid-1975, the IOSS report recommended that the Army break up existing intelligence organizations and reassemble them into a new configuration. These recommendations led to the most sweeping reorganization of Army intelligence in a generation. At the center of this transformation, the Army established a single intelligence command to control an integrated, worldwide structure that provided multi-discipline intelligence support to the Army. The Army Security Agency (ASA), the Army’s Signals Intelligence (SIGINT) organization, was the cornerstone of this new command. To align itself to the new Army structure, ASA transferred its training, combat development resources, and logistics organization to other Army commands. In addition, ASA’s tactical SIGINT units were reassigned to the divisions or corps that they supported. On 1 January 1977, ASA was redesignated as U.S. Army Intelligence and Security Command (INSCOM). The new command merged ASA’s remaining SIGINT assets with the Counterintelligence (CI) and Human Intelligence (HUMINT) assets of the U.S. Army Intelligence Agency (USAINTA). Now a multi-discipline intelligence organization, INSCOM was formally established on 1 October 1977.

      In the aftermath of the Vietnam War, the U.S. Army reorganized almost all of its institutional and training headquarters to streamline important administrative functions while improving operational effectiveness. In late 1974, the Army cast its eyes on Army Intelligence to see if it was effectively organized and efficiently managed. The instrument of this scrutiny was the Intelligence Organization and Stationing Study (IOSS), a panel of senior officers headed by Maj. Gen. James J. Ursano. Released in mid-1975, the IOSS report recommended that the Army break up existing intelligence organizations and reassemble them into a new configuration. These recommendations led to the most sweeping reorganization of Army intelligence in a generation. At the center of this transformation, the Army established a single intelligence command to control an integrated, worldwide structure that provided multi-discipline intelligence support to the Army. The Army Security Agency (ASA), the Army’s Signals Intelligence (SIGINT) organization, was the cornerstone of this new command. To align itself to the new Army structure, ASA transferred its training, combat development resources, and logistics organization to other Army commands. In addition, ASA’s tactical SIGINT units were reassigned to the divisions or corps that they supported. On 1 January 1977, ASA was redesignated as U.S. Army Intelligence and Security Command (INSCOM). The new command merged ASA’s remaining SIGINT assets with the Counterintelligence (CI) and Human Intelligence (HUMINT) assets of the U.S. Army Intelligence Agency (USAINTA). Now a multi-discipline intelligence organization, INSCOM was formally established on 1 October 1977.

      In the aftermath of the Vietnam War, the U.S. Army reorganized almost all of its institutional and training headquarters to streamline important administrative functions while improving operational effectiveness. In late 1974, the Army cast its eyes on Army Intelligence to see if it was effectively organized and efficiently managed. The instrument of this scrutiny was the Intelligence Organization and Stationing Study (IOSS), a panel of senior officers headed by Maj. Gen. James J. Ursano. Released in mid-1975, the IOSS report recommended that the Army break up existing intelligence organizations and reassemble them into a new configuration. These recommendations led to the most sweeping reorganization of Army intelligence in a generation. At the center of this transformation, the Army established a single intelligence command to control an integrated, worldwide structure that provided multi-discipline intelligence support to the Army. The Army Security Agency (ASA), the Army’s Signals Intelligence (SIGINT) organization, was the cornerstone of this new command. To align itself to the new Army structure, ASA transferred its training, combat development resources, and logistics organization to other Army commands. In addition, ASA’s tactical SIGINT units were reassigned to the divisions or corps that they supported. On 1 January 1977, ASA was redesignated as U.S. Army Intelligence and Security Command (INSCOM). The new command merged ASA’s remaining SIGINT assets with the Counterintelligence (CI) and Human Intelligence (HUMINT) assets of the U.S. Army Intelligence Agency (USAINTA). Now a multi-discipline intelligence organization, INSCOM was formally established on 1 October 1977.

      In the aftermath of the Vietnam War, the U.S. Army reorganized almost all of its institutional and training headquarters to streamline important administrative functions while improving operational effectiveness. In late 1974, the Army cast its eyes on Army Intelligence to see if it was effectively organized and efficiently managed. The instrument of this scrutiny was the Intelligence Organization and Stationing Study (IOSS), a panel of senior officers headed by Maj. Gen. James J. Ursano. Released in mid-1975, the IOSS report recommended that the Army break up existing intelligence organizations and reassemble them into a new configuration. These recommendations led to the most sweeping reorganization of Army intelligence in a generation. At the center of this transformation, the Army established a single intelligence command to control an integrated, worldwide structure that provided multi-discipline intelligence support to the Army. The Army Security Agency (ASA), the Army’s Signals Intelligence (SIGINT) organization, was the cornerstone of this new command. To align itself to the new Army structure, ASA transferred its training, combat development resources, and logistics organization to other Army commands. In addition, ASA’s tactical SIGINT units were reassigned to the divisions or corps that they supported. On 1 January 1977, ASA was redesignated as U.S. Army Intelligence and Security Command (INSCOM). The new command merged ASA’s remaining SIGINT assets with the Counterintelligence (CI) and Human Intelligence (HUMINT) assets of the U.S. Army Intelligence Agency (USAINTA). Now a multi-discipline intelligence organization, INSCOM was formally established on 1 October 1977.